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Sensing Savvy

How Surgeon Specialization Impacts Patient Outcomes

Posted by Roger DeLong, CP, PE, MBA on Sep 19, 2016 7:00:00 AM

The phrase “practice makes perfect” has never been more true than in surgery. Research shows that better outcomes are associated with an increased procedure volume. While practicing and completing procedures can affect patient outcomes, the British Medical Journal (BMJ) has found that specializing in a specific procedure may be just as important as the number of times you perform it.

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Topics: Clinical Trends, Cardiothoracic

Technology Trends Impacting Cardiothoracic Surgery You Need to Know

Posted by Anna Mueller, MS on Aug 15, 2016 7:00:00 AM

Cardiothoracic surgery, Twitter chats and website design may not seem like the perfect combination, but when it comes to accessing the latest journal articles, connecting with patients and expanding your practice, they can be invaluable.

At the 2016 STS Annual Meeting, a panel of cardiothoracic experts shared how these and other internet technology trends are impacting cardiothoracic surgery.

Here are three technology trends impacting cardiothoracic surgery you need to know:

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Topics: Cardiothoracic, CABG Surgery

How Working Locum Tenens can Reduce Surgeon Burnout

Posted by Thomas Gole, DO, FAAFP on Aug 10, 2016 6:30:00 AM

You struggle to get yourself to the hospital for your shift. You’re not as engaged with patients and your peers as you once were. You might even find yourself dealing with feelings of anxiety and depression. You’re likely suffering from burnout, and like over half of your colleagues, you’re not alone.

Over 50 percent of surgeons report feelings of burnout. Researchers also found that rates of burnout among surgeons increased between 2013 and 2016, with female surgeons experiencing burnout more often than their male colleagues.

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Topics: Cardiothoracic

How to Increase Efficiency in the Operating Room

Posted by Thomas Gole, DO, FAAFP on Jul 18, 2016 7:00:00 AM

One of the costliest areas in a hospital is the operating room. Despite its high costs, the OR is also one of the top revenue generators, bringing in between $15 - $20 per minute, and that’s just for a basic surgical procedure.

But as budgets become tighter and patients and insurance companies seek a greater value for their money, hospitals are examining ways to increase efficiency in the operating room. Imagine the money and time wasted each time a case is delayed by a search for a piece of missing equipment.

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Topics: Hospital Administration, Cardiothoracic, CABG Surgery

The Evolving Role of the Cardiac Perfusionist: 3 Trends to Watch

Posted by Roger DeLong, CP, PE, MBA on Jun 8, 2016 6:30:00 AM

As a perfusionist, you love what you do—you’re making a positive impact on people’s lives. For this very clinical profession that has been consigned to the OR, you might be surprised to learn that technology advancements and changes in procedures are allowing perfusionists to leave the OR and make their way to patients’ bedsides.

To get more insight into what’s on the horizon for cardiac perfusion, we spoke to an expert. Here are a few of the trends to watch if you’re a cardiac perfusionist.

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Topics: Cardiothoracic

Surgeons Measure Blood Flow in Newborns with Cardiac Abnormalities

Posted by Roger DeLong, CP, PE, MBA on May 20, 2016 7:00:00 AM

The surgical challenges to correct the cardiac abnormalities in children born with only a single ventricle are enormous and fraught with pitfalls.

Although overall outcomes of the three-staged surgical repair of patients with a functional single ventricle have improved, a high mortality rate still persists after stage I repair, mainly due to “in- parallel” circulation. Stage II repair involves creation of a bidirectional cavopulmonary shunt or BCPS to create an “in- series” circulation to correct this problem.

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Topics: Cardiothoracic

Flow Measurements Help Predict Outcomes of Kids’ Pulmonary Artery Banding

Posted by Roger DeLong, CP, PE, MBA on May 16, 2016 7:00:00 AM

Pulmonary artery banding (PAB) has been the standard treatment for patients with high pulmonary blood flow who are awaiting subsequent surgery. The band is designed to provide adequate systemic flow to the body by restricting pulmonary flow. This allows the patient to grow and therefore become a better candidate for follow-up surgery.

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Topics: Cardiothoracic

Is Working as a Locum Tenens Perfusionist Right for You?

Posted by Roger DeLong, CP, PE, MBA on May 9, 2016 6:30:00 AM

A new challenge. A change of pace. For a profession that involves a lot of intense clinical work, these phrases might seem foreign to many cardiovascular perfusionists. But they don’t have to be.

The profession is evolving thanks to advancements in technology and medical procedures, and like other medical professionals, you can take advantage of locum tenens opportunities to expand your horizons, face new challenges or simply travel. It can be a career-shaping opportunity for many professionals.

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Topics: Clinical Trends, Cardiothoracic

3 New Things for Hospital Executives: March Edition

Posted by Thomas Gole, DO, FAAFP on Mar 28, 2016 6:30:00 AM

Hospitals Focus On Reducing Harm When harm occurs, it’s natural to want to blame someone. Patient safety experts, however, say that medical errors aren’t necessarily the fault of a person, but rather the result of a faulty system. Several hospitals have made efforts to reduce harm by:

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Topics: Cardiothoracic

CABG in 2012: Evidence, Practice and the Evolution of Guidelines

Posted by Thomas Gole, DO, FAAFP on Mar 21, 2016 7:00:00 AM

A short eight-page article by Dr. David Taggart, one of 25 ECS/EACTS Myocardial Revascularization Guidelines authors, provides an excellent overview of current treatment for coronary artery disease (CAD), the findings of various randomized trials, and the implication of current data for the need for multi-disciplinary heart teams to ensure the best avenue for treatment for their CAD patients.

The publication points out that, despite a decline in the number of CABG surgeries due to improved medical therapy and percutaneous stenting, more than 500,000 patients worldwide undergo CABG annually with excellent results and an estimated mortality of about 1%. Heart teams must establish whether a proposed intervention (stenting or surgery) is planned for symptomatic and/or prognostic reasons, or justified by significant ischaemia (>10% of myocardial mass).

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Topics: Cardiothoracic, CABG Surgery