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Sensing Savvy

Profile of Excellence: Dr. John A. Waldhausen

Posted by Susan Eymann, MS on Feb 7, 2018 7:31:00 AM

Former Professor and Chair, Dept. of Surgery, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Penn State College of Medicine
72th AATS President (1991-1992)

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Topics: Cardiothoracic

Profile of Excellence: Dr. Thomas L. Spray

Posted by Susan Eymann, MS on Jan 31, 2018 7:30:00 AM

Chief of the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery,
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
89th AATS President (2008-2009)

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Topics: Cardiothoracic

Giving Back: Emily Farkas MD, Humanitarian Surgeon

Posted by Susan Eymann, MS on Jan 22, 2018 7:29:00 AM

Humanitarian cardiac surgeon Dr. Emily A. Farkas is committed to giving back. Not only is she one of the 3% of board-certified cardiac surgeons who are women, but she is a role model for a younger set of surgeons who chose to give back by serving as a global humanitarian volunteer.

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Topics: Cardiothoracic

Profile of Excellence: Dr. John L. Ochsner

Posted by Susan Eymann, MS on Jan 17, 2018 7:30:00 AM

Chairman Emeritus, Department of Surgery, Ochsner Health System, 73rdth AATS President (1992-1993)

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Topics: Cardiothoracic

Profile of Excellence: Dr. G. Alexander Patterson

Posted by Susan Eymann, MS on Jan 8, 2018 7:30:00 AM

Washington University Chief of Surgery
90th AATS President (2009-2010)

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Topics: Cardiothoracic

Profile of Excellence: Dr. James L. Cox

Posted by Susan Eymann, MS on Dec 6, 2017 7:30:00 AM

James L. Cox was born in 1942 in Fair Oaks, Arkansas, into a family of rice farmers. A baseball scholarship at the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) provided his first pathway to higher education. Upon graduation he returned to his parents’ farm. Dr. Cox recalls driving the family’s truck one day laying down gravel when he went back to the house for lunch, his mother greeted him with a letter saying that he had been accepted at the University of Tennessee Medical School. Then his father came out to say that a scout from the Los Angeles Dodgers had stopped by to make a final offer. Knowing from the time he was 16 that he wanted to become a doctor, he accepted the first offer.

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Topics: Cardiothoracic

Cardiothoracic Powerhouses: Baylor College of Medicine

Posted by Susan Eymann, MS on Nov 29, 2017 7:30:00 AM


Although Baylor College of Medicine is now a preeminent center for cardiothoracic surgery, it is a relatively young institution — less than 75 years old — and its beginnings were inauspicious. It opened in 1946 after President Franklin Roosevelt, in 1944, approved the purchase of 118 acres from the Hermann estate for the construction of a 1,000-bed naval hospital in Houston. The hospital, later renamed the Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, became a teaching facility for the Baylor College of Medicine.

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Topics: Cardiothoracic

Profile of Excellence: Dr. Joseph S. Coselli

Posted by Susan Eymann, MS on Oct 25, 2017 8:00:00 AM

A born and bred Houstonian, Dr. Joseph S. Coselli graduated from a Jesuit high school in Houston and headed for Notre Dame University intent on following in his father’s footsteps and becoming a lawyer. That plan changed during the summer between the freshman and sophomore years at college when he had the opportunity to work for Dr. Denton Cooley as part of his “pump” team. There, in the early glory days of cardiothoracic surgery when surgeons were performing as many as 25 to 30 “on pump” cases a day, it just clicked and he knew what he wanted to become — a cardiothoracic surgeon.

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Topics: Cardiothoracic

Profile of Excellence: Dr. Joel D. Cooper

Posted by Susan Eymann, MS on Oct 9, 2017 8:00:00 AM

Dr. Joel D. Cooper, M.D. was born in Charleston, West Virginia, into a family of rabbis. Both his father and grandfather had been rabbis. Ever since he was a boy he liked to experiment with gadgets and set off trying to make explosives when he got his first chemistry set. His mother once told him that he would have been happy being a mechanic, but she was happy he became a doctor.

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Topics: Cardiothoracic

How Cardiothoracic Surgeons Can Go On Vacation

Posted by Roger DeLong, CP, PE, MBA on Sep 13, 2017 8:00:00 AM

Doctors often use the excuse that they have too much to do to take vacation. According to a study by Project: Time Off, Americans waste a record 658 million vacation days a year. The main reasons for doing so included returning to a pile of work, having no one else who can do the job, and not being able to afford a holiday.

These arguments are real challenges for many physicians. While it feels great to finally get away, the preparation leading up to a trip can be incredibly stressful. And thinking about the amount of work you’ll have to catch up on after vacation is enough to put a damper on any trip planning.

But while these problems may seem insurmountable, not prioritizing break time can have dire consequences to your health. Fortunately, you can use some effective strategies to make downtime less worrisome, and health benefits that will have you considering time off more seriously.

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Topics: Cardiothoracic

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