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Sensing Savvy

What It Takes to Become an Academic Surgeon

Posted by Susan Eymann, MS on Dec 4, 2017 7:31:00 AM

The term “academic surgeon" generally refers to a medical school’s department of surgery faculty member. Dr. Fred A. Crawford Jr., Distinguished Professor of Surgery at the Medical University of South Carolina, calls academic surgeons “triple threat” surgeons who operate, teach and also do research. He prefers to use the term “scholarship” instead of research as one of the triple threats because research generally connotes laboratory research and might not include other scientific endeavors such as analysis of clinical outcomes.

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Topics: cardiothoracic surgery

What to Know About Patient Reviews & How to Combat Negative Reviews

Posted by Roger DeLong, CP, PE, MBA on Aug 30, 2017 8:00:00 AM

Every day, more patients are turning to the internet to research and leave feedback on their physicians. In a survey by Software Advice, the percentage of patients using online reviews increased by 68% between 2013 and 2014. Platforms like Yelp, Vitals, Healthgrades and RateMDs act for doctors the same way as review sites do for hotels, spas and restaurants. While doctors are dealing with the hard realities of online reviews, you can make patient feedback posted online work in your favor. Here's how to combat negative reviews the right way.

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Topics: cardiothoracic surgery

Doctors Need More Than Clinical Expertise to Succeed

Posted by Roger DeLong, CP, PE, MBA on Aug 28, 2017 7:45:00 AM

As a physician, you’ve spent years mastering your abilities. With all that training, you should have all the skills you need to secure — and perform well at — a job, right? Not necessarily. A recent survey from LinkedIn found that many medical school students don’t always have the skills they need to succeed in the rapidly evolving and heavily competitive healthcare job market.

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Topics: cardiothoracic surgery

4 Ways Surgeons Can Build Trust with Their Staff

Posted by Thomas Gole, DO, FAAFP on May 15, 2017 7:00:00 AM

“Patients trust us. We can’t take that trust for granted.”

This was the sentiment from Leonard Arnold, a surgical technician at Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center. Arnold was explaining a situation in an OR where the surgical team was participating in a “time-out” — a pre-surgery routine where all surgical staff take time to ensure they are operating on the correct patient, the correct site and the correct procedure. But there was one important person missing from this time-out: The performing surgeon.

 In Arnold’s story, the surgeon had refused to participate until a hospital official finally reprimanded him.

While surgeon-patient trust is often discussed, trust and collaboration between a surgeon and his or her staff can be overlooked.

Improved collaboration not only creates more trust among your staff, it also helps improve the patient experience.

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Topics: cardiothoracic surgery

First Successful Heart Surgeries Performed Over Century Ago

Posted by Susan Eymann, MS on Apr 3, 2017 7:00:00 AM

Over 100 years ago, two surgeries performed in Norway and Germany, respectively, marked the beginning of cardiac surgery. Until that time, the heart was considered sacrosanct and was not to be violated by surgeons’ hands.

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Topics: Cardiothoracic, cardiothoracic surgery

Pioneers in Cardiothoracic Surgery: Dr. René Favaloro

Posted by Susan Eymann, MS on Feb 16, 2017 12:00:00 PM

Dr. René Gerónimo Favaloro was an Argentine cardiac surgeon who pioneered coronary artery bypass surgery while at the Cleveland Clinic. He was born and raised in La Plata, capital of the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina to carpenter Juan B. Favaloro and Ida Y. Raffaelli, a dressmaker, both immigrants from Sicily, Italy.

Soon after completing his undergraduate degree in 1941, Favaloro was inducted into the Argentine army where he served for five years. In 1946, he left the service and continued his medical studies at La Universidad Nacional de La Plata, graduating in 1949. He would spend the next 12 years in a small farming community, La Pampa, as a rural physician. There, he educated patients about preventive medicine, established the first “mobile” blood bank in this area, and built his own operating room, where he trained general and surgical nurses. He later wrote about this period of his life in his book Memoirs of a Country Doctor.

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Topics: Cardiothoracic, cardiothoracic surgery

Pioneers in Cardiothoracic Surgery: Dr. Christiaan Barnard

Posted by Susan Eymann, MS on Feb 13, 2017 7:00:00 AM

On Dec. 3, 1967, a medical milestone was made in Cape Town, South Africa. A 54-year-old grocer, Louis Washkansky, received a heart transplanted from a young woman who died in a fatal accident while crossing the street. A medical team of 30 under the direction of Dr. Christiaan Barnard, assisted by his right-hand man and brother Marius, performed the nine-hour operation. Washkansky survived the operation and lived for 18 days before succumbing to pneumonia.

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Topics: Cardiothoracic, cardiothoracic surgery

Pioneers in Cardiothoracic Surgery: Dr. Norman Shumway

Posted by Susan Eymann, MS on Feb 8, 2017 7:00:00 AM

Norman Edward Shumway M.D., Ph.D., Stanford University Frances and Charles Field Professor of Cardiovascular Surgery, Emeritus, was born February 9, 1923, in Kalamazoo, Michigan. His father ran a creamery. Shumway was quiet, witty, irreverent and intuitive about people and about what would and would not work. Despite his fame as the father of heart transplantation, he shunned publicity.

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Topics: Cardiothoracic, cardiothoracic surgery

Pioneers in Cardiothoracic Surgery: Dr. Denton Cooley

Posted by Susan Eymann, MS on Feb 2, 2017 7:00:00 AM

"What he did, more than anyone else, was make heart surgery safe." —O.H. Frazier, M.D. (Denton Cooley protégé)

Denton Cooley, one of the greatest heart surgeons of the 20th century, was a third-generation Houstonian. He was born in 1920 in comfortable economic circumstances. His father was a successful dentist; his maternal grandfather, a physician. As a young scholar and athlete, Cooley showed great promise. As a youth, he was inspired by his parents and a family friend who also was his mother’s obstetrician, Dr. E.W. Bertner, who later founded the Texas Medical Center.

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Topics: Cardiothoracic, cardiothoracic surgery

Pioneers in Cardiothoracic Surgery: Dr. John Kirklin

Posted by Susan Eymann, MS on Jan 25, 2017 7:00:00 AM

When professor Stephen Westaby, a heart surgeon at John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, England, decided to go to the United States to refine his surgical skills, he was advised, “Go to Kirklin. There you will learn discipline.”

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Topics: Cardiothoracic, cardiothoracic surgery